1. August 20th, 2014

    Alex Turner by Francesco Castaldo

    (Source: disfordancefloor, via arcticsmonkeygifs)

    933

    933 Notes

  2. August 20th, 2014

    oursadsongs:

    "I’m gonna fly like a bird through the night. Feel my tears as they dry."

    32 Notes

  3. August 20th, 2014

    wah-mos:

eggsasperated:

Ummmmm

are you kidding me, this is so perfect ha

    wah-mos:

    eggsasperated:

    Ummmmm

    are you kidding me, this is so perfect ha

    (Source: ajgreenfanclub)

    23057 Notes

  4. August 20th, 2014

    kaxxajenn:

Essential Homme
Aug/September 2014Photographer - Kevin Sinclair

    kaxxajenn:

    Aug/September 2014
    Photographer - Kevin Sinclair

    (via seeing-white-rabbits)

    610 Notes

  5. August 20th, 2014

    fabforgottennobility:

James Foley
NEVER FORGOTTEN
photo Nicole Tung, Syria, Aleppo

Fuck. Journalists like him are heroes 

    fabforgottennobility:

    James Foley

    NEVER FORGOTTEN

    photo Nicole Tung, Syria, Aleppo

    Fuck. Journalists like him are heroes 

    225 Notes

  6. August 18th, 2014

    
Fleetwood Mac, 1976.

    Fleetwood Mac, 1976.

    (Source: crystalline-, via wah-mos)

    16488 Notes

  7. August 18th, 2014

    girltrash420:

    michael cera made an album and its super chill 

    yo I anticipated a far weirder time listening to his album, but it is pretty lovely 

    31 Notes

  8. August 16th, 2014

    woodstock-festival:

"I went to Woodstock as a member of the audience. I did not show up there with a road manager and a couple of guitars. I showed up with a change of clothes and a toothbrush." -John Sebastian

45 years, man oh man

    woodstock-festival:

    "I went to Woodstock as a member of the audience. I did not show up there with a road manager and a couple of guitars. I showed up with a change of clothes and a toothbrush." -John Sebastian

    45 years, man oh man

    56 Notes

  9. August 16th, 2014

    nprglobalhealth:

As ‘Voluntourism’ Explodes In Popularity, Who’s It Helping Most?
As you plan — or even go — on your summer vacation, think about this: More and more Americans are no longer taking a few weeks off to suntan and sightsee abroad. Instead they’re working in orphanages, building schools and teaching English.
It’s called volunteer tourism, or “voluntourism,” and it’s one of the fastest growing trends in travel today. More than 1.6 million volunteer tourists are spending about $2 billion each year.
But some people who work in the industry are skeptical of voluntourism’s rising popularity. They question whether some trips help young adults pad their resumes or college applications more than they help those in need.
Judith Lopez Lopez, who runs a center for orphans outside Antigua, Guatemala, says she’s grateful for the help that volunteers give.
All visitors and volunteers get a big warm welcome when they walk in the doors of her facility, Prodesenh. It’s part orphanage, part after-school program and part community center.
Most of the kids at Prodesenh don’t have parents, Lopez says. They live with relatives. Some were abandoned by their mothers at birth. Others lost their fathers in accidents or to alcoholism.
There are three volunteers here now, all from the U.S. Lopez says they give the kids what they need most: love and encouragement.
One those volunteers is Kyle Winningham, who just graduated from the University of San Francisco with a degree in entrepreneurship. “Yeah, my real name is Kyle, but mi apodo aqui es Carlos,” he says.
Continue reading.
Photo: Haley Nordeen, 19, is spending the entire summer at the Prodesenh center in San Mateo Milpas Altas, Guatemala. The American University student helped build the center’s new library. (Carrie Kahn/NPR)

    nprglobalhealth:

    As ‘Voluntourism’ Explodes In Popularity, Who’s It Helping Most?

    As you plan — or even go — on your summer vacation, think about this: More and more Americans are no longer taking a few weeks off to suntan and sightsee abroad. Instead they’re working in orphanages, building schools and teaching English.

    It’s called volunteer tourism, or “voluntourism,” and it’s one of the fastest growing trends in travel today. More than 1.6 million volunteer tourists are spending about $2 billion each year.

    But some people who work in the industry are skeptical of voluntourism’s rising popularity. They question whether some trips help young adults pad their resumes or college applications more than they help those in need.

    Judith Lopez Lopez, who runs a center for orphans outside Antigua, Guatemala, says she’s grateful for the help that volunteers give.

    All visitors and volunteers get a big warm welcome when they walk in the doors of her facility, Prodesenh. It’s part orphanage, part after-school program and part community center.

    Most of the kids at Prodesenh don’t have parents, Lopez says. They live with relatives. Some were abandoned by their mothers at birth. Others lost their fathers in accidents or to alcoholism.

    There are three volunteers here now, all from the U.S. Lopez says they give the kids what they need most: love and encouragement.

    One those volunteers is Kyle Winningham, who just graduated from the University of San Francisco with a degree in entrepreneurship. “Yeah, my real name is Kyle, but mi apodo aqui es Carlos,” he says.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Haley Nordeen, 19, is spending the entire summer at the Prodesenh center in San Mateo Milpas Altas, Guatemala. The American University student helped build the center’s new library. (Carrie Kahn/NPR)

    72 Notes

  10. August 16th, 2014

    felineillusion:

"Death’s like life. Death’s a part of life. It isn’t frightening. It isn’t the end of everything. It isn’t quiet and nothingness. It’s a part of all eternity."
- Irena
The Curse of the Cat People / 1944 / dir. Robert Wise

    felineillusion:

    "Death’s like life. Death’s a part of life. It isn’t frightening. It isn’t the end of everything. It isn’t quiet and nothingness. It’s a part of all eternity."

    - Irena

    The Curse of the Cat People / 1944 / dir. Robert Wise

    18 Notes

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